Publications

You can view my Google scholar profile here

If you are unable to access any of the files below, please email me!

Published Articles

  1. Chapman, A., Devue, C., & Grimshaw, G. M. (2019). Fleeting reliability in the dot-probe task. Psychological Research, 83(2), 308–320. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-017-0947-6
  2. Chapman, A. F., Hawkins-Elder, H., & Susilo, T. (2018). How robust is familiar face recognition? A repeat detection study of more than 1000 faces. Royal Society Open Science, 5, 170634. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.170634
  3. Tooley, M. D., Carmel, D., Chapman, A., & Grimshaw, G. M. (2017). Dissociating the physiological components of unconscious emotional responses. Neuroscience of Consciousness, 3(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1093/nc/nix021

Manuscripts submitted or in preparation

  1. Chapman, A. F., & Störmer, V. S. (submitted). Feature-based attention is not confined by object boundaries: spatially global enhancement of irrelevant features. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/356vk
  2. Rezlescu, C., Chapman, A. F., Susilo, T., & Carramazza, A. (submitted). Large inversion effects are not specific to faces and do not vary with object recognition ability. https://doi.org/10.17605/osf.io/XZBE5
  3. Chapman, A. F., Bell, L., Duchaine, B., & Susilo, T. (in prep). Reduced holistic processing in developmental prosopagnosia: evidence from a large, online study.
  4. Hunkin, L. M., Chapman, A. F., Kranz, L., Corballis, P. M., & Grimshaw, G. M. (in prep). Engagement with angry faces during attentional bias modification: Insights from the N2pc.

Book Chapters

  1. Brady, T. F., Störmer, V. S., Shafer-Skelton, A., Williams, J. R., Chapman, A. F., & Schill, H. M. (2019). Scaling up visual attention and visual working memory to the real world. In K. D. Federmeier & D. M. Beck (Eds.), Psychology of Learning and Motivation (Vol. 70, pp. 29–69). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.plm.2019.03.001

Conference presentations

Talks

  1. Chapman, A. F., & Störmer, V. S. (2020). Flexible focus in feature-based attention: efficient tuning of attention to narrow and broad ranges of task-relevant feature values. Paper presented at the Virtual Meeting of the Vision Science Society 2020. (video)
  2. Chapman, A. F., & Störmer, V. S. (2019). Feature-based attention is not confined by object boundaries: spatially global enhancement of irrelevant features. Paper presented at the 46th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Experimental Psychology, Wellington, New Zealand.
  3. Chapman, A., Devue, C., & Grimshaw, G. M. (2015). Reliability of attentional biases in the dot-probe task. Paper presented at the 4th KiwiCAM conference, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
  4. Chapman, A., Tooley, M. D., Carmel, D., & Grimshaw, G. M. (2014). Gone in a flash: No evidence for unconscious perception of emotional valence. Paper presented at the 3rd KiwiCAM conference, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Posters

  1. Barszcz, A., Chapman, A. F., Chunhuras, C., & Störmer, V. S. (2020). Feature-based attention warps perception of color. Poster presented at the Virtual Meeting of the Vision Science Society 2020. (download)
  2. Chapman, A. F., Geweke, F., & Störmer, V. S. (2019). Feature-based attention resolves differences in target-distractor similarity through multiple mechanisms. Poster presented at the Vision Science Society, St Pete Beach, FL, USA. https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.45a (download)
  3. Chapman, A. F., & Störmer, V. S. (2018). Feature-based attention spreads within and between objects. Poster presented at Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA, USA. (download)
  4. Chapman, A. F., Bell, L., Duchaine, B., & Susilo, T. (2018). Varieties of holistic processing defecits in developmental prosopagnosia. Poster presented at the Vision Science Society, St Pete Beach, FL, USA. https://doi.org/10.1167/18.10.917 (download)
  5. Rezlescu, C., Susilo, T., Chapman, A., & Carramazza, A. (2017). Large inversion effects are not specific to faces and do not vary with object expertise. Poster presented at the Vision Science Society, St Pete Beach, FL, USA. https://doi.org/10.1167/17.10.250
  6. Chapman, A., Devue, C., & Grimshaw, G. M. (2016). Fleeting reliability in the dot-probe task. Poster presented at the Australasian Society for Experimental Psychology, Melbourne, Australia.
  7. Grimshaw, G. M., Tooley, M. D., Chapman, A., & Carmel, D. (2015). Dissociating unconscious emotion through differential physiological responses. Poster presented at the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, Paris, France.

Twice Told Stories, Seattle, WA, 8/21/17